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Grass-fields African Transformation: Kelsz Beautz

Grass-fields African Transformation: Kelsz Beautz

GRASS-FIELDS PRESENTS AFRICAN PRINT

The African Queen Transformations

Grass-fields would like to present Kelsz, a YouTube vlogger and owner of the kelsz Beautz channel. Her channel takes you on an emotional journey celebrating her inner and outer beauty. She speaks about her trials and tribulations regarding life, hair and make up for black women. Before her big transformation from Kelsz Beautz to African Queen we caught up with the girl herself.

Why did you become a beauty blogger?

'I became a beauty vlogger and blogger because I was always into makeup and people would always ask me how I would do beauty-related things. I found out YouTube was a way of me showing others what I could do!'

Why do you use social media?

'I blog, vlog and Instagram because I love to learn new things and I enjoy sharing what I know with others. As for blogging, my camera roll is filled with selfies and I just want to share my beautiful pictures with others. It’s also a very creative way of summing up what I’m about; a picture is worth a thousand words after all.'

What do you think influences your style choices?

'In terms of my fashion choices, I tend to be influenced by the high street fashion trends. I follow trends and try to start them!'

Do you wear African print daily?

'No, I’m scared of colour sometimes and African print is very bold. It is very different from the high street styles that I am used to wearing. I am hoping this shoot will change my perspective and make me confident with African prints.'

Would you ever wear African print to work?

'Yes, I would. I’m not sure how I would.' Click here to find out how to style African prints

How do you feel about African prints?

'I think African print is so beautiful, vibrant and effortless to wear especially in the UK due to the mix of varying cultures.'

What culture do you identify yourself as?

'Even though I live in the UK, I identify more with Jamaican culture because I was born and raised in Jamaica'

Where do you get your confidence from as a black woman?

'It comes from self-love and seeing how black women worldwide share this view which is evident in the evolution of the melanin trend.'

What is your greatest achievement?

'It is a little personal but I am proud to say my greatest achievement is having my 4-year-old son after a miscarriage and being able to be a great mother.'

What is your greatest failure?

'My greatest failure is giving up on my relationship and misjudging the character of the new person I’d met, rather than fixing the issues of my previous relationship. I tried to replace the person I genuinely cared for and in the end, I looked like a fool but I’ve learned so much more about myself as a person and what I want in life. Now I’m rebuilding with the person I cared for.'

Was there ever a time that you felt unattractive?

'Yes, I feel unattractive when I’ve gained weight or when my skin is bad.

What is your biggest worry when wearing bright colours?

'My biggest worry when wearing bright colours is that everyone will be looking at me because I’m plus size.'

What makes you get up in the morning?

'Firstly, it’s God almighty, secondly is to see my sons beautiful face and thirdly to do things that make me happy.'

Do you think African culture has changed from when you were a child?

'Definitely, there is a greater awareness of African culture and people from the Caribbean and other ethnicities are more keen to know about their African roots. Well, I am for sure!'

Are you scared of African prints?

'I was terrified of African print before seeing all your beautiful designs. I’ve always tried to stay away from colours most of the time, but this shoot could help me be more confident in wearing prints.'

What was your happiest fashion memory growing up?

'My happiest fashion memory growing up was when my mum got me the most amazing outfit for Christmas. It was a black and gold Bardot top with black leather pants and a pair of black platforms. I was happy with the way I looked and everyone loved it so I felt amazing the whole time.'


Do you wear African print often?

'No, I don’t wear African print often because I’m Jamaican. It’s not my traditional culture so I felt like it wasn’t really my place to wear African prints.'

Up until now, there weren't many black-owned businesses. Now you see black-owned businesses springing up in hair, makeup and fashion. Why do you think black-owned businesses are suddenly becoming stronger and popular?

'I think it is becoming more popular because black people have now realised that other races are taking our money and not fully catering to us. For black hair and make-up I think only a black person can truly know what is suitable for our skin tones and hair textures so it’s only smart that we take it into our own hands. To do it right and not just settle for the grey tones in foundations and hair products that can’t help our hair textures. I think it’s really good that black-owned businesses are evolving as its enforcing our sense of community.'

Watch Me Transform!

Let's Slay!

And Slay some more...

And then...

KELSZ IS MODELLING THE AFRICAN CAMELIA MAXI DRESS

We couldn't stop there...

Watch Kelsz's full transformation below:

Want to find out more about Kelsz? Check out her YouTube and Instagram.

Stay tuned for more Grass-fields transformations with your favourite bloggers!
Love Grass-fields xxx

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